Tennessen House - 1208 Cranford Pl

 Print Listing Historical Name - Lux House
Style - Bungalow
Built Year - 1920
State ID - 5WL3703

Description - Constructed in 1920, this bungalow residence is located on the south side of Cranford Place, in the block between 12th and 13th avenues. The house is supported by a low concrete foundation, faced with red brick. There is a full basement beneath the dwelling, and the foundation walls are penetrated by 3-light hopper basement windows. Built of wood frame construction, the dwelling's exterior walls are clad with painted white horizontal wood siding, with 1" by 4" corner boards. Painted purple square-cut wood shingles appear in the upper gable ends on the north and south elevations. The house is covered by a low-pitched front gable roof, with grey asphalt shingles, and with exposed rafter ends, beneath widely-overhanging eaves. Decorative purlins and a ridgepole adorn the house's upper gable ends on the south and north elevations. There are two red brick chimneys - one is a fireplace chimney located on the exterior of the east elevation/ the other chimney is located on the roof ridge. The house's windows are all unaltered from their original configuration, and all feature painted white wood frames and surrounds, and painted white exterior wood storm windows. Most of the windows are single or paired 3-over-1 (ribbon style) double-hung sash; however, a set of three light casement windows flank the fireplace chimney on the east elevation, and a three-light hopper bathroom window is located on the west elevation. The house features a Craftsman style front porch which covers the western 2/3s of the fa├žade. The porch features brick kneewalls and pedestals and tapered brick piers, which support a gabled porch roof. Three concrete steps at the east end of the porch lead to a white metal storm door at the porch's exterior. A stained natural brown wood-paneled door, with a transom light and flanking sidelights leads from the porch into the home's interior. A rear entrance into the home is located on the south elevation. Here, a painted white wood-paneled door, with one upper sash light, and with a white metal storm door at the porch's exterior. A stained natural brown wood-paneled door, with a transom light and flanking sidelights leads from the porch into the home's interior. A rear entrance into the home is located on the south elevation. Here a painted white wood-paneled door, with one upper sash light, and with a white metal storm door, opens onto a concrete sidewalk.

Historical Background - Built in 1920, this residence has served as a single-family home from that time to the present. According to Greeley city directories, the home's original occupants were Edward (Ed) and Mabel Carlson, who lived here for a single year in 1920-1921. Carlson, who was a farmer, was followed by another short-term occupant, W.E. Anderson. Mr. Anderson was employed as a produce dealer, and according to the directories, he lived here with his wife Elizabeth and two children in 1922 and 1923. In 1925 or 1926, 1208 Cranford Place became the residence of Dr. Leo L. Lux and his wife Helen. Dr. Lux then owned and lived here for the next four-and-a-half decades, until the early 1970s. Dr. Lux was a physician and surgeon in Greeley. In the 1940s his medical office was located in the Greeley Building at 802 8th Avenue, and in the 1960s his office was located at 827 8th Avenue. Owners or residents of this property from the early 1970s have included Patti E. Boldt, Beverly J. Colbrunn, R.M. Wimmer, and Ross D. Pendill. Ross Pendill lived here during his retirement years, between circa 1978 and his death in September 1997. Mr. Pendill had been born on December 3, 1911 at Battle Creek, Michigan and was apparently related to Dr. Lux on his mother's side of the family. (Mr. Pendill's mother's maiden name was Louise Lux, but her precise relationship, if any, to Dr. Leo Lux is unknown.) Mr. Pendill enjoyed a distinguished career as an electrical engineer, before he retired to Greeley in 1977. Following his retirement he became very active in community affairs involving retired persons. He served on the board of directors of the Larimer-Weld County area Agency of the Aging, and was president of the Greeley chapter of the American Association of Retired Persons.